f.lux


f.Lux is a cool little utility that appeals to the lighting geek in me. What it does is adjusts the color temperature of your monitor or laptop screen, based on the time of day, "warming it up" at night and "cooling down" during the daytime, because it has been shown that looking at cool illuminants in the evening can screw up your circadian rhythm. This is no joke; when your circadian entrainment is screwed up, it's been linked to all kinds of problems such as depression, several types of cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and obesity. Matter of fact, night shift work -- which generally involves people being wide awake and working, generally under cool fluorescent light -- is so…

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Published


So, last month, I presented a paper at SimBuild 2010. Today, the lab I work for published a link to the preprint, which enters me into the scientific roll call. I am stoked. Check it out: http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy10osti/47522.pdf…

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Radio Radiance


Last Thursday, I hit the airwaves, yakking about lighting simulation. For some reason the Boulder Green Building Guild was interested in my take on the use of simulation in optimizing the energy efficiency of building designs in the US, on the latest installment of Footprint Radio. It was a thrill to share the half-hour with Kostas Papamichael from the California Lighting Technology Center, and my buddy Mike Plann from Lightlouver. I hope one or two people listen, and are intrigued enough to explore daylighting design, or at least turn off the lights once in a while. The cool thing is I'm now in the iTunes Music Store. Check it out by listening to the show on the BGBG's website, or…

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Blast from the Past


(light transport simulation geekery alert) Freshly inspired from the recent Radiance Workshop, and cooped up under 22 inches of snow in Boulder, yesterday I took an old web page I created and integrated it into my website. It's a summary of my first foray into the use of illums on a project. This page dates back to 2003; I've been told it's helpful, so I thought I'd get it back online with all my other crap. Here's the link: http://www.rumblestrip.org/interests/light/using-the-illum-material-for-smoother-renderings-in-radiance/ Happy rendering.…

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Line


This is cool. What we got here is the last remnants of the 8" of snow that dumped on Boulder yesterday. The Colorado sun came out in force today, melting most of the white stuff; the final traces are hanging tough here in the shadow cast by the ballfield fence, all nice and neat in a line, while Hooper and Lulu watch in despair as Jeannie and the other woman walk away with their dogs Joplin and Kyla: Just goes to show you what a little shading can do in terms of reducing the amount of direct beam solar radiation that affects a given area. P.S. The bits of snow missing in the foreground were eaten by Hooper. No…

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Lumen Awarded


A former co-worker just IM'ed me to let me know that a project I worked on has received two Lumen Awards for exemplary lighting/daylighting design. I am pretty psyched, since to date these are my first two Lumens in my 15 year career in lighting. Awards are stupid, until you win one. Yay! Looking back, it's interesting because this was the project that finally got me to get over the learning curve of Radiance, as the tools I had been using were simply not up to the job of simulating the daylight and electric lighting in this complex space. This project forced me to learn Radiance, made me jump back to the Apple Macintosh world (because of OSX's superior…

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Well, duh...


From "Advanced Global Illumination", first edition: The field of optics stayed mostly dormant during the dark ages... Like, duh. In all seriousness, this looks like a great textbook on some of the theory behind the software I use every day to do my lighting simulations (I managed to score a used copy through Amazon.com for less than half the list price recently, and it arrived today). All the squiggly lines and Greek characters are a little intimidating, but I generally can get the gist of what the authors are trying to say about light transport through them, even if I did fail Algebra II.…

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Sunset!


At last, a quality sunset has graced the skies over Boulder. One of the things I loved about living in Santa Fe oh so long ago was the amazing sunsets that were an almost daily occurrence. Usually in the afternoon the sun's rays would have spawned a good thunderstorm, and the scattered clouds left in its wake would become the perfect reflectors of the setting sun's rays. It seems that Boulder is almost too clear, its skies almost always devoid of those great puffy cumulus clouds that are a requirement for a quality sunset. But today we had three storms in town, the result of the brutal heat and relentless sun we've been experiencing, no doubt. These storms left behind…

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Light


Today, I emerged from my morning shower to find Emma perfectly centered in this direct sun patch on my bedroom floor. Luckily I had my camera on me, so I could get the shot: The old gal sure hasn't forgotten how to find her light, has she? She kinda has a Neil Diamond in "The Jazz Singer"-thing going on, you ask me. Or maybe late Sinatra, like right before he started forgetting the lyrics to his songs -- that single spotlight, high drama thing. I think she looks great. Too bad she can't sing.…

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ltview: a Radiance utility


Update/note: This utility has been through a few changes. It currently exists as a Perl script written by Axel Jacobs, and is part of the Radiance source code. Get some! /rpg, April 18, 2014 Radiance User: “Boy, that objview script sure is handy for looking at scene geometry; if only there was something like that for looking at the distribution of my light source files.” Announcer: “Well, THE WAIT IS OVER!! That’s right, now there’s a script that has the ease of use of objview, but is scientifically engineered for use with Radiance light source input files! Plus, if you call now, we'll include K-Tel’s “70’s platinum…

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Boo


<p>Here&#8217;s what happens when you get a bunch of lighting designers together to carve a pumpkin. Say hello to the Pumpkin Projector:</p> <p><img src="http://www.rumblestrip.org/site-img/pumpkin03.jpg" alt="RDG pumpkin, 2003" width="260px" /></p> <p>For those interested, we used a 20W <a href="http://www.lighting.philips.com/nam/prodinfo/halogen/p1118g.shtml">ALR spot lamp</a> for the light source. </p> <p>Happy Halloween. Boo.</p>…

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Of shoulders and loads


Well, I have been somewhat disconnected from email for the last few days, and I almost broke out in a rash from it, but it was worth it. Yesterday, I conducted a six hour workshop on lighting software at the 2003 Lightfair International, the annual Big Event in my chosen vocation’s calendar. I was told my proposal for the workshop was accepted back in October of last year, and ever since, May 5th has hung ominously from my shoulders, as I fretted over what the content should be, and whether it would be interesting enough to hold attention for six hours. Today is May sixth; May fifth is history, and my shoulders have descended from their customary position…

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Why the sky is blue


<p>The next time a toddler asks you &#8220;why is the sky blue?&#8221;, how about answering &#8220;why Junior, the answer is simple. <a href="http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/atmos/blusky.html">Rayleigh scattering is the reason</a>.&#8221;, instead of your usual &#8220;Because it&#8217;s not green.&#8221; </p>…

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